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Our GCSE learning and revision blog includes syllabus based topics for subjects including GCSE Maths, English Language, English Literature, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Science, Double Science and Triple Science.

How to tackle Chemistry calculations in GCSE exam papers
GCSE Chemistry
Ryan

How to tackle Chemistry calculations in GCSE exam papers

At the end of this, you should be able to: calculate the percentage composition of a compound, use the terms relative atomic mass, relative molecular mass and relative formula mass correctly, calculate the percentage yield of a chemical reaction…

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GCSE English Language
GCSE English Language
Ryan

GCSE English Language Paper 1: Writing about Structure Question 3 Focus

Exams are around the corner, you have done mock exam after mock exam and for some reason, every time you attempt that English Language Paper 1, Question 3, you can’t seem to get above 5 marks! Well, don’t give up just yet. I’m about to share some gems with you that should help you in approaching the question and being aware of exactly what the examiner is looking for. I’ll walk you through understanding the big picture of the question, what the mark scheme says, techniques you can expect to find and also tips and guidance on how to answer the question.

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Moles in chemical calculations
GCSE Chemistry
Ryan

Dimensional Analysis: How to use moles in chemical calculations

The chemical concept of a “mole” is very important to being able to perform calculations in chemistry. Remember from your class that an atom’ atomic weight refers to the number of grams in one “mole” of that material. What exactly is a mole? And how can we use it in calculations while not confusing ourselves with all the different units and conversion factors? It’s easy to panic when you’re given so many different units to convert, and a complicated reaction to follow. What’s the easiest way to keep yourself on track?

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Pythagoras
GCSE Maths
Ryan

An introduction to tackling Pythagoras questions

Pythagoras is one of those maths things that sounds a lot more complicated than it actually is. As this is an intro to it, we’ll take a little look at where it all came from first. The Pythagorean theorem was developed by Pythagoras, a mathematician from Ancient Greece, or at least it’s credited to him no-one really knows if it was him for definite, but let’s be honest, it doesn’t matter who developed and proved it, all that matters is that we need to do it on our GCSE papers.

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